A True Leader; Newsletter #39

3 Little Wonder Bites

📖 Current Read; 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living — Ryan Holiday

The Daily Stoic Meditation for July 12 outlines a few simple rules for life;

  • Don’t procrastinate
  • Don’t confuse
  • Don’t wander
  • Don’t be passive or aggressive
  • Don’t be all about business

Photo by Tyler Lastovich on Unsplash

Don’t Procrastinate

Procrastination is the enemy of productivity.

Procrastination, for the most part, is a monster!

Make Procrastination More Painful Than Hard Work

A key way to get around the issue of procrastination is to purposefully make it more painful than hard work.

One of the reasons why you procrastinate is because you don’t want to do the work, simply because it is hard, challenging and difficult.

You avoid it for as long as you can.

However, if you make procrastination more painful, you’ll be left with almost no choice!

You’ll be inclined to choose the option with less discomfort.

This leads you to get the hard work done.

You need to attach pleasure with the things that are difficult, and pain with the things that are easy.

If you attach pleasure with hard work, you’ll be incredibly inclined to get that hard work done.

If you attach pain with procrastination, you’ll avoid it as much as you can!

Don’t Confuse

You need to be objective.

When you are in a conversation, you cannot confuse or twist what the other says.

No matter if you want to hear something different, or you’re scared of their truth, you cannot confuse.

You must take what they say objectively and act only on that.

Don’t Wander

Within your thoughts, don’t wander too much.

It is evident that some wandering and exploration of the mind is a good thing.

It is a sign of intelligence and tranquility — something that Einstein prioritised and encouraged.

Exploration and mindless thought can enable you to discover great things and make breakthroughs!

However, wandering isn’t always great.

Sometimes wandering can lead your thoughts down an incredibly dark place, which has many obvious risks.

Wandering can also be used as a distraction, from your real responsibilities or current situation.

Let your thoughts wander, but not too much.

Don’t Be Passive Or Aggressive

Do not be passive or aggressive.

There is almost no situation where aggression (real, angry aggression) is necessary.

Rather than being passive and aggressive, you should work on cultivating kindness!

Kindness for yourself and for others.

Don’t Be All About Business

This last point is incredibly important!

You cannot be all about work and no fun.

You cannot talk about business or go on about your work excursions 24/7.

It is often that people stay away from those that are all about business.

People do not want to talk about business all the time.

People want to have fun! People want to let loose and be rewarded for their hard work.

The last thing they need is someone who is constantly thinking about work and trying to get deals.

It’s important to note that it is incredibly beneficial to focus on your business, just not all the time.

It is always good to try make connections and advance your business.

However, you cannot do so all the time, for it becomes exhausting for those around you.

You need to make the clear distinction, and separate business from fun.

Idea of the Week. 💭

A Leader Leads

Lack Of Immaturity

Too many people in great positions of power are immature.

Too many people do not know how to use their power to their advantage, and instead, make silly mistakes based on immaturity.

A leader, however, does not have this type of immaturity.

A leader does not commit silly mistakes just because they want recognition or approval from others.

A leader doesn’t expect favours in return, they just keep leading.

A leader doesn’t hold others to the same standards, they just keep leading.

A leader doesn’t gloat about their good work, they just keep leading.

A leader understands that they don’t need to show off the good work that they do.

A leader understands that the universe works purposefully, and they will be rewarded for their work when it is needed — they don’t need to beg for that reward.

Just Keep Leading

A leader just keeps leading.

That is the job of a leader — to keep going.

Rather than begging for appreciation and recognition and praise, they just keep leading.

Wouldn’t you prefer a leader that pushes forward, rather than one that stays stagnant just to hear a few congratulations?

A real leader keeps leading no matter what.

Quote of the Week. 🗣

Marcus Aurelius, a great Stoic philosopher, on how doing the right thing is enough.

“When you’ve done well and another has benefited by it, why like a fool do you look for a third thing on top — credit for the good deed or a favor in return?”

— MARCUS AURELIUS, MEDITATIONS, 7.73

Doing The Right Thing Is Enough

Doing the right thing is enough.

Doing something good, from the bottom of your heart, without any hidden motivations, is enough.

Simply just being kind and offering assistance is enough.

In fact, doing the right thing is more than enough.

Many people don’t even offer common courtesies or niceties.

If you do the right thing without expecting anything in return, it is more than enough.

Your Reward Will Come

Your reward will come.

You do not need to go around asking for favours or celebrations.

You must place trust that your reward for good, honest and hard work will come.

To end, here’s a question from me! ⚡️

How can you ensure you have balance in your life?

Often we may find ourselves overworked, or perhaps lacking fun and enjoyment within life.

Prioritise balance and incorporating a little bit of everything.

Thanks for reading!

Until next week,

Sam. 😆

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Sam M

Sam M

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happiness in all areas of life. student 👨🏻‍🎓. 2 weekly newsletters, daily stoic meditations + occasional articles and book summaries.